3rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from BO FRANSSON with 119 notes

bofransson:

Claude Monet - Vue du village de Giverny, 1886

bofransson:

Claude Monet - Vue du village de Giverny, 1886

3rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from BO FRANSSON with 128 notes

bofransson:

Edward Hopper - The City

bofransson:

Edward Hopper - The City

3rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from BO FRANSSON with 139 notes

bofransson:

Interior with Stained-Glass Window, c. 1880 John Singer Sargent

bofransson:

Interior with Stained-Glass Window, c. 1880 John Singer Sargent

3rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from THEFULLERVIEW with 297 notes

thefullerview:

(via Pin by t h e f u l l e r v i e w on b l o o m i n g | Pinterest)

thefullerview:

(via Pin by t h e f u l l e r v i e w on b l o o m i n g | Pinterest)

3rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Tundras with 51 notes

tierradentro:

Born on this day (07/03/1738): John Singleton Copley.

Portrait of Paul Revere" (with detail), 1770.

3rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Les Illusions perdues with 107 notes

polyeucte-melitena:

Alfred Sisley (French, 1839-1899), Saint-Mammès. June Sunshine, 1892. Oil on canvas, 66 x 92.5 cm.

polyeucte-melitena:

Alfred Sisley (French, 1839-1899), Saint-Mammès. June Sunshine, 1892. Oil on canvas, 66 x 92.5 cm.

3rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Kimono Gallery with 23,214 notes

leslieseuffert:

Yukio Takano (Japan) Mushroom Light Lamps

Source: leslieseuffert

3rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from art for art's sake with 990 notes

hotgranola:

La Casa Azul - Museo Frida Kahlo

This is a must see if you visit Mexico City. Walking into the former home of Frida and Diego felt so personal. Her work is already a diary on canvas, so seeing where she lived and created her art was so inspiring. 

Viewing her work up close made me love her paintings even more - so full of pain, color and soul. 

The only thing I know is that I paint because I need to and I paint whatever passes through my head without any further consideration. - Frida Kahlo

Source: hotgranola

3rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Dido of Carthage with 32 notes

didoofcarthage:

Apollo and Daphne after the group of statues by Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini in the Galleria Borghese in Rome by Jean-Etienne Liotard
1736
pastel on paper
Rijksmuseum 

didoofcarthage:

Apollo and Daphne after the group of statues by Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini in the Galleria Borghese in Rome by Jean-Etienne Liotard

1736

pastel on paper

Rijksmuseum 

3rd May 2014

Photo reblogged from The Getty with 794 notes

thegetty:

The viewpoint is oblique, with the figures seen slightly from above. The empty space is perplexing, both open and closed. Similarly, there is an emotional contrast between the dancer in a white tutu, who is “active,” and the formally dressed figure, who is “passive.” In effect, Degas succeeds in portraying a sense of isolation in the midst of a big city that is elsewhere pulsating with life, and it is this feeling of loneliness and anonymity in a crowd that is comparable with our own experiences of modern life.
—Art historian Christopher Lloyd on Edgar Degas’s pastel Waiting
The J. Paul Getty Museum. Owned jointly with the Norton Simon Art Foundation, Pasadena

thegetty:

The viewpoint is oblique, with the figures seen slightly from above. The empty space is perplexing, both open and closed. Similarly, there is an emotional contrast between the dancer in a white tutu, who is “active,” and the formally dressed figure, who is “passive.” In effect, Degas succeeds in portraying a sense of isolation in the midst of a big city that is elsewhere pulsating with life, and it is this feeling of loneliness and anonymity in a crowd that is comparable with our own experiences of modern life.

—Art historian Christopher Lloyd on Edgar Degas’s pastel Waiting

The J. Paul Getty Museum. Owned jointly with the Norton Simon Art Foundation, Pasadena